Now in paperback! A combination of Le Carré spycraft with Stephenson techno-philosophy, Charlie Huston delivers a new kind of thriller for a new kind of world.
Click here to read Charlie’s Tumblr.

Now in paperback! A combination of Le Carré spycraft with Stephenson techno-philosophy, Charlie Huston delivers a new kind of thriller for a new kind of world.

Click here to read Charlie’s Tumblr.

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It just smacked me in the face. At that time, every script, every book, everything that I was reading was—and still is—just there to be one thing. Every script, no matter how good it was, always felt like it was declaring what it was in the first five pages and just spending the next 85 or 115 fulfilling its own promise without ever really trying to do anything else. I was so struck by this story that seemed to do that but then would jerk into something else—and then into something else.

Director-writer Jim Mickle on what it was like to read Joe Lansdale’s novel Cold In July, which Mickle has adapted into a movie.

Mickle’s put his finger on one of the things we love, love, love about Joe Lansdale: his virtuosic range, often within a single page.

(Source: insidemovies.ew.com)

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littlebrown:

Killer Summer: Peeps on the Beach.

We hope they don’t melt out there!

If you want to read like a Peep, check out:

The String Diaries by Stephen Lloyd Jones

The Three by Sarah Lotz

Those Who Wish Me Dead by Michael Koryta

The Directive by Matthew Quirk

These peeps have excellent taste.

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Austin Grossman, his editor Josh Kendall, and the Poetry Genius community annotate the opening chapters of You. It’s like a mad cross between a book club and VH1’s pop-up videos.

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If I wanted to tell this story as a movie, there are much, much, much easier ways of me getting the project going than sitting down to write a novel over the course of several years.
Marc Guggenheim responding to the question, “Are you facing a lot of people who just think you’re writing so you can adapt it to film later?

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Go back to the novel that started it all… We’ve just reissued the first Joseph O’Loughlin novel in paperback!
Click here to find out why a clinical psychologist like Joe makes for the perfect hero.

Go back to the novel that started it all… We’ve just reissued the first Joseph O’Loughlin novel in paperback!

Click here to find out why a clinical psychologist like Joe makes for the perfect hero.

Happy publication day to Marc Guggenheim! The co-creator of Arrow delivers a propulsive hit in this novel about a CIA lawyer who uncovers a worldwide conspiracy…one that appears to originate from within the US intelligence community.
Click here to read more about Overwatch

Happy publication day to Marc Guggenheim! The co-creator of Arrow delivers a propulsive hit in this novel about a CIA lawyer who uncovers a worldwide conspiracy…one that appears to originate from within the US intelligence community.

Click here to read more about Overwatch

littlebrown:

Congratulations to our LA Times Book Prize winners! 

Countdown by Alan Weisman

The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith

We Need New Names by NoViolet Bulawayo

See the full list here.

Three cheers for THE CUCKOO’S CALLING! For those of you who haven’t read Galbraith’s debut, the mystery will be available in paperback on April 29th.

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The story you walk into, he has learned, is always more complex than it first appears
S by Doug Dorst (via defygravityandflyfree)

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We don’t want to be hit men. We don’t find them glamorous; we’re repulsed by them. But we want to understand. As soon as we recognize something as being beyond our sensibilities, we have a need to learn why this isn’t the case for others. It isn’t a desire to see them succeed that leads us to crime fiction but rather the chance to stand close and watch how they fail.
Malcolm Mackay writes a brilliant piece on hit men for The New York Times. We have the great privilege of publishing his Glasgow trilogy next year!

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