renaroo:

DC Writers Spotlight: Greg Rucka

There’s no writing like Rucka writing, in my opinion. I really can’t think of a writer who has a greater hold on such a huge array of DC characters and narratives. For many of these characters, Rucka’s characterization is my standard.

If it has Greg Rucka’s name on it, you can guarantee I’ll give it a try.

Personal recs:

Rucka’s Wonder Woman
Gotham Central
Batman/Huntress: Cry for Blood
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And everything he’s done with Kate Kane’s Batwoman.

You know what else has Greg Rucka’s name on it? His awesome novels featuring Jad Bell: Alpha and the newly-released Bravo.

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I once bum-rushed a coked-up transvestite down a flight of stairs without spilling my beer. I was pretty proud of that, not spilling the beer.
Richard Lange talks to BULL about the time he worked the door at a nightclub. He’s the author of Angel Baby and the forthcoming story collection, Sweet Nothing.

(Source: bullmensfiction.com)

captainahabsrarebooks:

First Edition of HEED THE THUNDER (1946) by Jim Thompson. 

Praised by Richard Wright, Millen Brand, and Louis Bromfield and now finally available in paperback.

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David Shafer’s incredible debut novel is on sale today, and the New York Times got it a wonderful birthday present: a book review that declares, “Whiskey Tango Foxtrot may be the novel of the summer.”
Read the first chapter.

David Shafer’s incredible debut novel is on sale today, and the New York Times got it a wonderful birthday present: a book review that declares, Whiskey Tango Foxtrot may be the novel of the summer.”

Read the first chapter.

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atomicbooks:

New editions of Jim Thompson books! #atomicbooks

We’ve reissued Jim Thompson’s entire backlist in paperback! Collect em all and rediscover the hardboiled crime master.

atomicbooks:

New editions of Jim Thompson books! #atomicbooks

We’ve reissued Jim Thompson’s entire backlist in paperback! Collect em all and rediscover the hardboiled crime master.

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oquangulated:

Lauren brings some intriguing ideas to the table in each of those books.  I will not spoil in this review; if you haven’t read her work yet, I envy you the experience of being able to read her for the first time.  She brings an intuitive understanding of great stories to the table.  It would be unfair to box her as a “mystery writer” or “thriller writer” or “scifi writer”.  Pigeonholing impoverishes the work and the reader.

I find her dystopias utterly believable, barbaric and sophisticated in a way seldom seen since Gibson’s seminal works.  Speaking of, note to self:  reread them.  Her works recall that great stories are made not on technology or magic, but on people.  Her characters are real, and we react viscerally to their plights.  This is a hallmark of a good writer.

Hear, hear! Did you all know Lauren Beukes has a new novel on the way? It’s called Broken Monsters, and it’s out in September.

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Chatting with James Sallis About the Republication of Death Will Have Your Eyes

  • The Reading Room: How does it feel to have the novel back out in the public eye (with a striking new cover!) for a generation of readers who perhaps missed it the first time?
  • James Sallis: Well, considering that almost everyone seems to have missed it the first time, it feels great. Tremendous. The book’s had a tiny group of ardent fans over the years, was even optioned for some time, but it more or less remained among the good dishes you don’t bring out often.
  • RR: Tell us about your writing process. Do you have a particular routine – things that you prefer to have in place – or is it more of a free for all? And has it changed over the years?
  • Sallis: The thing I have “to have in place” is butt in chair, and that’s definitely become more difficult over the years. No more three- and four-hour writing jags; I can’t sit for more than forty minutes or so before I’m up, wandering about the house, reaching for a mandolin or guitar. There’s a lot more wandering about in the story itself, too: rummaging, poking it with sticks, seeing what comes to the top.
  • RR: What needs to happen on page one of a novel to make for a successful book that urges you to read on?
  • Sallis: The writer must lean close to me and whisper “I have something important to tell you.”

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The stakes are not merely life or death, but the difference between a blundering through one’s life and fully possessing it.
Laura Miller in Salon perfectly describes why Whiskey Tango Foxtrot by David Shafer is a thriller unlike any other. I can’t wait for you all to read it when it goes on sale next Tuesday.

(Source: salon.com)

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The newest addition to the Mulholland Classic series is James Sallis’s Death Will Have Your Eyes. This espionage novel is suffused with music references. For the optimum reading experience, press play on the playlist above, pour yourself a cup of coffee (black), and crack open this slim, spare book to enter the world of a re-activated spy.

(Source: Spotify)

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The nature of modern warfare, modern espionage, is that it has truly become global – there is no one front, it’s all the front. In the same way that terrorism and organized crime have synthesized into one organism, we’re seeing the same in regard to military and espionage operations. To depict that, the whole world had to be open for play.
Greg Rucka talks to The Reading Room about widening the scope of Jad Bell’s world in his new novel, Bravo.

(Source: thereadingroom.com)

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