Looking to sample some excellent summer reading? We present to you the Hachette Book Group Summer Reading Fiction Sampler 2014, which is available as a free digital download from your favorite retailers.
This sampler includes a chapter from David Shafer’s forthcoming novel, Whiskey Tango Foxtrot. We love this novel and encourage you to sample that first!

Looking to sample some excellent summer reading? We present to you the Hachette Book Group Summer Reading Fiction Sampler 2014, which is available as a free digital download from your favorite retailers.

This sampler includes a chapter from David Shafer’s forthcoming novel, Whiskey Tango Foxtrot. We love this novel and encourage you to sample that first!

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ruckawriter:

All this to say, world, here is my new book. It’s name is BRAVO, and it’s about a somewhat broken man trying to do his duty, and a somewhat broken woman trying to recover what she’s lost in doing hers.
To those of you who pick it up, who give it a try, my thanks. I sincerely hope you enjoy it.

In which I bow out and let Mulholland’s eloquent authors describe their own novels way better than I ever could. 
But seriously, Bravo is so good, and I hope you can find some time this week to visit a real or imagined digital bookstore to pick up a copy.

ruckawriter:

All this to say, world, here is my new book. It’s name is BRAVO, and it’s about a somewhat broken man trying to do his duty, and a somewhat broken woman trying to recover what she’s lost in doing hers.

To those of you who pick it up, who give it a try, my thanks. I sincerely hope you enjoy it.

In which I bow out and let Mulholland’s eloquent authors describe their own novels way better than I ever could. 

But seriously, Bravo is so good, and I hope you can find some time this week to visit a real or imagined digital bookstore to pick up a copy.

(Source: mulhollandbooks)

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sonnywithagoodbook:

S. written by Doug Dorst and concept by J.J. Abrams

"One book. Two readers. A world of mystery, menace, and desire.

A young woman picks up a book left behind by a stranger. Inside it are his margin notes, which reveal a reader entranced by the story and by its mysterious author. She responds with notes of her own, leaving the book for the stranger, and so begins an unlikely conversation that plunges them both into the unknown.

THE BOOK: Ship of Theseus, the final novel by a prolific but enigmatic writer named V. M. Straka, in which a man with no past is shanghaied onto a strange ship with a monstrous crew and launched onto a disorienting and perilous journey.

THE WRITER: Straka, the incendiary and secretive subject of one of the world’s greatest mysteries, a revolutionary about whom the world knows nothing apart from the words he wrote and the rumours that swirl around him.

THE READERS: Jennifer and Eric, a college senior and a disgraced grad student, both facing crucial decisions about who they are, who they might become, and how much they’re willing to trust another person with their passions, hurts, and fears.”

Goodreads  -  Book Depository  -  More Info

Confession: I read S. for the concept. I mean the idea behind the design and the intertwining stories of Eric, Jessica, S, and Straka is genius and I applaud J.J. Abrams for it. The postcards, newspapers, letters, maps drawn on napkins, just wow. But there’s so much more to this novel.

Doug Dorst is the real talent behind S. and I found myself getting lost in his words. Certain quotes hit me like a ton of bricks, making me dissect each page with the intensity of a copy editor. The plot in general didn’t make much sense to me and…

hover for spoilers.

Also, Eric and Jennifer’s assumptions were a little unbelievable and I was convinced that they were just guessing. But I do have a nagging feeling that there is so much I missed and that I haven’t even scratched the surface of the mystery. I think S. is the kind of novel you have to read three times to fully understand: once for the experience, twice for the story, and a third for the details (kind of like Lost - damn you JJ Abrams). 

Overall, you have to read it. You have no choice. Read it for the experience, for all the little odds and ends tucked away in the pages, for the writing in the margins, for the amazing design (there were legitimate ink stains on the pages, also it smells like a library book and I don’t know how). But watch out: aesthetic isn’t everything and the writing will blow your mind.

Favorite Quotes:

"You can’t ever know in advance. Big decisions require faith."

"The feeling, for those seconds, is glorious-it reminds him that he is human, that he is so insignificant as to be utterly free, and he is being guided along gracefully, lovingly, by the hand of Nature-and it frees him,however transiently, from all worry and fear and fury and grief. ‘I enjoyed that,’ he says aloud, as much to the stars as to the rower."

"You’re born a certain way. Later you get to decide how much you want to fight/change that."

"The creation of art requires a descent into the dark."

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HAPPY PUBLICATION DAY!
Greg Rucka’s new novel, Bravo, follows two women: one, an American agent emerging from deep cover, is still coming to grips with what her “real” life really is. The other is an avid instrument of death, who will stop at nothing to execute her lover’s plans. Jad Bell, who saved the country once in Alpha, is going to have his hands full with these two.
Click here to read more about Bravo.

HAPPY PUBLICATION DAY!

Greg Rucka’s new novel, Bravo, follows two women: one, an American agent emerging from deep cover, is still coming to grips with what her “real” life really is. The other is an avid instrument of death, who will stop at nothing to execute her lover’s plans. Jad Bell, who saved the country once in Alpha, is going to have his hands full with these two.

Click here to read more about Bravo.

148 notes

We’re all just in the muck trying to believe we’re capable of greatness, but closer to breaking than we want to admit. And we tell ourselves stories—about ourselves,but maybe also all these stories about other people, about characters—as a way to hide from how small we are.
Doug Dorst, S. (via quoted-books)

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David Morrell Talks About the Historical Hero of His Novel, Murder as a Fine Art

  • Society Nineteen: Why do you feel that Thomas De Quincey is significant?
  • David Morrell: He was the first person to write about drug addiction at a time when opium in the form of laudanum was in everybody’s medicine cabinet and was used the same way we use aspirin. Many people were addicted to the drug, but the hypocrisy of the time was so severe that when De Quincey openly discussed his opium use, he became notorious and was called the Opium-Eater for the rest of his life. De Quincey was also an inventor of the true-crime genre. He was obsessed with the Ratcliff Highway mass murders of 1811. The first publicized multiple killings in English history, they paralyzed the entire country and created terror comparable to that of Jack the Ripper three-quarters of a century later.

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Alpha, the first book in Greg Rucka’s Jad Bell series, is on sale as a $1.99 eBook through Monday, July 21st. I, for one, have found this summer’s blockbuster movies to be a little lackluster. Reading Alpha delivers five times the thrills, for five times as long, and for a fifth of the price (math may not be exact). Here’s where to download:
Google Play | iBooks | Kobo | Nook

Alpha, the first book in Greg Rucka’s Jad Bell series, is on sale as a $1.99 eBook through Monday, July 21st. I, for one, have found this summer’s blockbuster movies to be a little lackluster. Reading Alpha delivers five times the thrills, for five times as long, and for a fifth of the price (math may not be exact). Here’s where to download:

Google Play | iBooks | Kobo | Nook

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denzelvswashington:

Storyboard for the Films on Paper class that I’m doing.

The scene comes from the book “S” by JJ Abrams and Doug Dorst.

KEEP GOING! This is amazing.

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BOLO Books Interviews Marcia Clark About Her New Novel, The Competition

  • BOLO Books: Did you and/or your publisher have any trepidation about centering your latest novel around a school shooting—with it being such a grim and hot-button topic of discussion these days?
  • Marcia Clark: People want to talk about this subject. They need to talk about it. We can’t push this under the rug and pretend that’ll make it all go away. We have to get out ahead of the problem and we can’t do that unless we to learn as much as we can, talk about it and find ways to spot these killers before they can act. That is, ultimately, our best protection. But it’s a difficult subject, to say the least. So putting it into a fictional setting creates somewhat of a remove, a safer forum to learn about it and think about it. I’ve been very glad and relieved to see all the positive reviews and reactions, and all the discussions the book has sparked.

It is my hope that The Competition will inspire some meaningful discussion about who these killers are, what we should watch out for and how we can protect ourselves and each other with that knowledge.
Did you know Marcia Clark spent a LOT of time studying psychopathy and sociopathy? Her research shines in her new novel, The Competition. Read her full interview with the Hartford Books Examiner for a taste.

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